Coopworth sheep facts

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Coopworth sheep primarily raised for wool. The breed is developed in New Zealand. A cross of Border Leicester and Romney, in the 1950s, resulted in Coopworth.

Coopworth sheep breed information

A medium-sized breed, with a white face and wool-free legs. 

Lambing is easy and they are excellent mothers.

Most of the parts resemble Romney sheep-like head, face, and body type.

Coopworth wool is long, excellent and thick.

The fleece is crimp with bright luster and the spinning count is 44 to 48, with a staple length of 6 to 8 inches.

Coopworth is an excellent mother, does not run off when disturbed.

The easier lambing and milk production makes this breed an excellent mother. 

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Things to know

In the 1970s breed was introduced to the United States. Raised primarily for wool

The Coopworth sheep have been selected on visual criteria, carcass and frame attributes, wool quality and measured performance.

Brief characteristics of Coopworth sheep

Breed NameCoopworth sheep
Other Name
Country/Place of OriginNew Zealand
Breed Purposewool
Breed Sizemedium
Weight
Ram(Male)
90 kg (200 lb)
Ewe(Female)65 kg (140 lb)
Kiddingone
Good for Stall Fedopen grazing 
Climate Tolerancelocal conditions

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